June 2011 E-Newsletter

June 16, 2011

PANCAKE BREAKFAST

I’ll be holding another one of my free Community Pancake Breakfasts on Saturday, June 25, 8:30-11 a.m., at the Campbell Community Center, 1 W. Campbell Ave., Campbell.  Please stop by and have a bite to eat. If you have questions about state issues such as the budget, education, state parks, or on another matter, I’ll be happy to address them. To RSVP, click here.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE

June 3 was the deadline day for the Assembly to pass bills that were introduced by Assembly members. Here’s a rundown on what happened to some of my key bills:

  • AB 57 – Passed by the Assembly and sent to the Senate. This legislation updates and balances the apportionment of members on the Metropolitan Transportation Commission by allowing the mayors of San Jose and Oakland to each appoint a new commissioner.
  • AB 69 – Passed by the Assembly and sent to the Senate. AB 69 directs the state to work with the Social Security Administration to target Social Security recipients eligible for CalFresh, formerly known as Food Stamps.
  • AB 79 – Re-referred to the Assembly Education Committee; becomes a two-year bill. AB 79 focused on generating private funding for research at University of California Institutes for Science and Innovation of emerging technologies with high job growth potential.
  • AB 81 – Held in Assembly Appropriations Committee. This bill focused on increasing business and traffic at California airports by stabilizing the jet fuel sales taxes.
  • AB 154 – Held in Assembly Appropriations Committee until 2012 in order to consider the implications of the new federal health care reform. This bill would prevent health insurers from denying coverage for medically necessary treatment of mental illnesses or substance abuse disorders.
  • AB 138 – Passed by Assembly and sent to the Senate. AB 138 ensures the accurate calculation of the annual income of a 65-year or older person needs to meet basic living needs in California. About 1.4 million seniors in California are denied access to Medi-Cal, Medicare, and CalFresh because of antiquated poverty criteria that fail to account for California’s higher cost of living.
  • AB 171—Held in Assembly Appropriations Committee until 2012 in order to consider the implications of the new federal health care reform. This bill would end the practice of health insurers denying children and adults with autism and related disorders from the services and programs they need.
  • AB 194 – Passed by Assembly and sent to the Senate. The bill would give foster youth attending California State University campuses and community colleges priority enrollment for registration. It also requests the University of California campuses to do the same.
  • AB 540 – Passed by Assembly and sent to the Senate. AB 540 would reduce the rate of infants born with prenatal exposure to alcohol and/or drugs by establishing a screening and brief intervention process for expectant mothers who are at high risk. The bill allows counties to pay the state’s share for the program to obtain a federal reimbursement for program costs.

To read more about these bills and other legislation, click here.

MANDATORY VACCINATIONS FOR STUDENTS

Under a new law that went into effect this year, California middle and high school students must be vaccinated against pertussis, also commonly known as whooping cough.

Beginning July 1, all students entering 7th through 12th grades in both public and private schools will be required to show proof of a “Tdap”  booster shot before starting school. There is no grace period and the new law will be strictly enforced.

Last year, there were more than 7,800 confirmed cases of whooping cough that resulted in the deaths of 10 infants, the California Department of Public Health reported.

To learn more, visit ShotsForSchool.org.